Graham Taylor Author
Graham Taylor Author

Graham Taylor Author; Graham Peter Taylor, pen name G. P. Taylor, is the best-selling author of Shadowmancer, Wormwood, and Tersias. He was formerly a police officer, motorcycle rider, and roadie for a rock band before becoming an Anglican clergyman in the village of Cloughton, North Yorkshire. Previously, he worked as a full-time novelist.

Taylor is married with three children and resides in Whitby, North Yorkshire. Taylor was born in the county of Yorkshire. He came to London in the 1970s and worked in the music industry with bands such as The Stranglers, Sex Pistols, Elvis Costello, and Adam and the Ants, among others. He had an interest in the supernatural as a child. He led a life that was “interested in all kind of strange and wondrous things and was not leading a holy life.” He then converted to Christianity and became a vicar for the Church of England, a denomination of Christianity.

Taylor completed the first draught of his first novel, Shadowmancer, which he self-published. Taylor’s book was issued prior to his appointment as a parish priest at The Whitby Bookshop, where he worked. Faber & Faber and G. P. Putnam’s Sons, respectively, have committed to publishing six further volumes.

He received a Quill Award nomination for his second novel, Wormwood. Tiresias, his third novel, was published in the United Kingdom in 2005. Following the publication of Shadowmancer in August 2006, Faber wrote The Curse of Salamander Street.

Taylor released The Tizzle Sisters & Erik in October 2006, after the release of Markosia. Taylor referred to the work as an “illustronovella.” He collaborated on the project alongside Tony Lee, Dan Boultwood, and Harry Potter illustrator Cliff Wright.

It was authored by Mark Denton, a photographer who also contributed some prose to the book.

Taylor declared in October 2009 that he will cease writing in order to care for his daughter, who suffers from Crohn’s disease. He did, however, publish three other works in the years that followed.

Graham Taylor Author
Graham Taylor Author

Graham Taylor Author

Taylor was dubbed the “sound man” by those who worked with bands such as The Stranglers and Elvis Costello. Taylor was born in the county of Yorkshire. He relocated to London in the 1970s and worked in the music industry. He had an interest in the supernatural as a child. He led a life that was “interested in a wide variety of strange and fascinating things and was not living a Christian life.” He converted to Christianity at that point and eventually became a vicar in the Church of England.

Taylor chose to self-publish his debut novel, “Shadowmancer,” after completing the manuscript. Faber & Faber in the United Kingdom and G. P. Putnam’s Sons in the United States immediately secured a publishing arrangement for six further novels. At this point, the parish priest resigned and relocated to a private residence three miles from his former parish. His writings have been translated into more than forty-eight different languages and adapted into films.

His second novel, “Wormwood,” was nominated for an American book prize named “The Quills” when it was published. He authored “Tersias” as his third novel, which was published in the United Kingdom in 2005. When “Shadowmancer” was published in 2006, Faber followed up with “The Curse of Salamander Street.”

Taylor published a book titled “illustronovella” in October 2006. Markosia titled it “The Tizzle Sisters and Erik.” Taylor collaborated on the book alongside Tony Lee, Dan Boultwood, and Cliff Wright, the artist behind “Harry Potter.” It was a hybrid of literature and comics.

It was authored by Mark Denton, a photographer who also contributed some prose to the book.

Graham Taylor is a Church of England priest and a former punk band roadie. “Hotter than Potter,” he has been dubbed, as well as “the next C S Lewis.” For a long time, John K. Rowling was at the top of the New York Times best-seller list, until Shadowmancer dethroned him.

Graham just launched a new project for schools aimed at educating students about biblical stories. The Shadowmancer, Wormwood, and The Vampyre Labyrinth are just a few of the works that have captured the imaginations of millions of young readers. And two films based on his novels are now under production.

The Flood, the Fish, and the Giant, which he co-authored with American freelance writer Paula K Parker, was just published and is currently being distributed in schools. It is referred to as YHWH. It’s a page-turning retelling of twenty beloved Bible stories in the same way as his books. It capitalizes on children’s fascination with magic and mystery without losing the stories’ fundamental truths.

Famous legends, such as David and Goliath, are reimagined in a way that keeps the reader on the edge of his seat. The author was inspired to write the book after hearing a football pundit speak to a field-level “David and Goliath struggle.” The pundit received several letters from individuals enquiring as to the meaning of the word.

Graham Taylor Author
Graham Taylor Author

Graham claims he visits around 200 schools each year to teach creative writing and concludes that “students know nothing about the Bible.” Then he visited with Paul Keeys, the director of Bible Explorer, a national teaching program in the United Kingdom that assists professional communicators in bringing the Bible’s message into schools through a series of courses based on various indicators that consistently engage and excite children.

Paul advised Graham that a fresh strategy for reaching out to young people needed to be devised. The author created the book’s concept, which he did not charge for. Normally, he requires a down payment of up to £250,000. Naturally, he will earn money from royalties. He has agreed to donate a share of the proceeds to Bible Explorer. His aim is that the children would turn to the Bible and read the stories in their entirety. If you discuss the Bible with children, they will think, “That’s so boring!” Informing them of a story is distinct. Paul Keeys has donated it to other schools.

Paula Parker, who interviewed Graham and maintains the buddyhollywood.com blog for film professionals in America, conducted the research for the book, which they were tasked with producing in just twelve weeks. And she was indispensable due to her “very quickness.”

Graham stated that he chose YHWH (the Hebrew word for God, omitting the vowels out of respect) as the title because he did not want to call him God “because that is not hip,” but the ancient name brings the element of mystery that pervades his works. The stories all include a strong theme of God’s perfect timing, which Graham describes as follows:

“That is precisely how he operates. He is the God of the eleventh hour, similar to the US Cavalry in that he is always on time.”

The author was a vicar living in a hamlet north of Scarborough, Yorkshire, and carrying out his duties. Then, almost out of nowhere, he began writing.

“As I returned home from preaching in Hull, I felt compelled to write a book. I began the following day when I awoke.

Following that, he was forced to sell his Harley Davidson motorcycle in order to fund the self-publishing of the book. This took him four months. However, word spread quickly, and Hollywood quickly turned Shadowmancer into a film.

Additionally, a film is expected to be released prior to it. It is based on a later novel titled Moriah Mundi. An orphaned child is assigned to work in a hotel on England’s northeast coast. There, he encounters a weird magician who has the ability to manifest objects.

“It’s a battle between good and evil, which is why I’m dubbed the new C. S. Lewis,” he explains. His other novel, The Curse of Salamander Street, chronicles a journey from York via Derbyshire and finally to London. It follows the historic York-Derbyshire coach route.

Graham Taylor Author
Graham Taylor Author